Scout Dike Reservoir

Discover our charming Scout Dike Reservoir.

Childs in wellington boots

Covid-19 update

In accordance with government guidance, our recreational sites and car parks remain open for people to exercise outdoors. We ask that you follow the latest guidance on group sizes and social distancing to help keep yourself, our key workers and others safe.

If you do plan to visit, we continue to request that you are respectful of our sites, staff members, other visitors and local communities:

  • Do not light any BBQs or fires and call 999 to report any uncontrolled fires that may be at risk of spreading.
  • Make sure you take any litter home with you.
  • Please follow any instructions on signage around the site.
  • Please follow designated paths. The paths are there to keep you and our key workers safe.
  • If the car park is full, please do not park on verges or on the road as this causes traffic issues and can block important access for operational vehicles or the emergency services.

Discover our charming Scout Dike Reservoir 

North of Penistone is Scout Dike reservoir, a charming reservoir with a medium length walk around the perimeter, which is mostly well surfaced apart from the final stretch. The walk does include steps which can be avoided by a moderately steep ramp. Park at our free car park just next to Barnsley Trout Club (on Huddersfield Road, Thurlstone, S36 7EZ) which includes accessible parking.

Facilities

ParkingDisabled parking Picnic area

Activities

Walking  Fishing  

Walks

Walk Distance Difficulty Facilities
Scout Dike walk 2 miles 1 out of 4

ParkingDisabled parking Picnic area

Fishing

In the beautiful foothills of the Pennines, Barnsley Trout Club offers forty acres of prime trout fishing at our Scout Dike Reservoir.

Barnsley Trout Club

illustration of trees

Make a day of it

While you're here, why not visit a nearby reservoir?

Ingbirchworth Reservoir

Visit Ingbirchworth Reservoir for the wonderful views from the 19th century dam wall. Bring binoculars to observe the thriving bird life and take a seat on one of the benches to enjoy the great outdoors.

Royd Moor Reservoir

The land around the reservoir is planted with mature native oak trees and lots of wildflowers, making it a nature lover’s retreat all year round.

How to get there

By car

You can use our free car park (S36 7EZ), just off the A629.


Parking

There are only 32 parking spaces at this car park, and they fill up quickly most days.


From Penistone

Head north on the B6462 (Huddersfield Road) for about a mile, until it meets the A629 (Halifax Road). Turn left to follow the A629 for about 200 metres, where the entrance to Scout Dike’s car park is on the left.


From Shepley

Follow the A629 (Halifax Road) southwards. After about 4½ miles, you will reach the entrance to the Scout Dike’s car park on the right.


By public transport

There's a bus stop 1 mile away on Talbot Road. Penistone train station (S36 6AJ) is also a 1¾ mile walk away.

Can you swim in Scout Dike Reservoir?

No, you can't swim in Scout Dike Reservoir. Reservoirs are really dangerous places and have lots of dangers hidden under the surface. We don't allow anyone to swim in our reservoirs, even if you’re a great swimmer!

Why can’t you swim in Scout Dike Reservoir?

Scout Dike Reservoir has lots of hidden dangers. The water is very cold (even in summer) and cold water shock can kill. Scout Dike Reservoir supplies water to be treated, so there's machinery and strong currents under the water. There may also be blue-green algae, which causes rashes and severe illnesses.

Can dogs swim in Scout Dike Reservoir?

No, it’s not safe for dogs to swim in Scout Dike Reservoir and they shouldn’t drink the water. Blue-green algae can form on the surface, which is poisonous and can kill them. There’s also dangerous machinery and strong currents under the water.

Is wild swimming allowed in Scout Dike Reservoir?

No, Scout Dike Reservoir is dangerous. Reservoirs aren't the same as natural lakes, they’re man-made and have large machinery that’s working 24/7 just below the surface. They’re also very cold, have strong currents and might have blue-green algae which causes rashes and severe illness.