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Scar House Reservoir

Since the government guidelines have changed, we’ve been working hard to devise a plan to keep everyone safe while enjoying our beautiful reservoirs. We’ve reopened the car parks at this reservoir so visitors can walk around them as long as social distancing rules are observed.

To help direct visitors, we’ve installed some new signs that are there for everyone to follow so please take a moment to read them.

  • Please maintain social distancing when walking around the reservoir
  • Please follow designated paths. The paths are there to keep you and our key workers safe.
  • Some of our paths may be closed off. This is because our key workers need to access them and they will be clearly signposted that they are closed.
  • Make sure you take any litter home with you and do not light any BBQs or fires.
  • If the car park is full, please do not park on verges or on the road as this causes traffic issues.

All of our toilet facilities are still closed at these reservoirs so please be mindful of this when visiting.

North of Pateley Bridge, deep in the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, is Scar House Reservoir sitting below Little Whernside. The natural beauty is paralleled in the masonry which is not only vast at over one million tonnes of stone, but intricately designed. Evidence of the old village, once home to 1250 villagers, can be seen to the left of the road when approaching Scar House.

The surrounding Moorland is being restored by the Yorkshire Peat Partnership, a Yorkshire Water funded project. Peat holds the same amount of emissions as 100 years’ worth of fossil fuels and only grows at 1 mm per year. The moorlands also support a wide range of birds like Curlew, Black Grouse and Hen Harriers, making them a crucial habitat in the UK. For this reason, a lot of the surrounding Moorland is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning they are protected by legislation.

Walks